Mozzarella Tutorial

Making butter, ice creams and cheeses for the homestead table.
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Farmfresh
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Mozzarella Tutorial

Unread post by Farmfresh » Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:03 am

Here is a good Mozzarella cheese tutorial that I found. Enjoy!

Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
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Old Fashioned
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Re: Mozzarella Tutorial

Unread post by Old Fashioned » Wed Dec 13, 2017 7:24 pm

I really like this video & think she did a great job of explaining the step by steps, plus the 'if you do this, that will happen' like when she messed up with the salt & citric acid. This looks like it would be sooooo easy even I could do this |em23|


I wonder if she has other cheese making videos??? Maybe cheddar? I do know it is a more dry cheese & that cheddaring is a process as much as it is a type of cheese.......I think it has to do with the pressing & draining of the whey several times? |em22|

I have NO idea where to find rennet of any kind......other than the lining of a sheep's stomach. Or is it from something else? |em22|

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Farmfresh
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Re: Mozzarella Tutorial

Unread post by Farmfresh » Wed Dec 13, 2017 8:56 pm

Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

Old Fashioned
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Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2014 11:51 am

Re: Mozzarella Tutorial

Unread post by Old Fashioned » Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:10 pm

Thanks Farm.....and that's not a bad price either....I was expecting much more.

I thought you could buy it in the stores, or somewhere......or is that of days gone by and now is only available online???

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Farmfresh
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Re: Mozzarella Tutorial

Unread post by Farmfresh » Wed Dec 13, 2017 9:13 pm

Pretty much. I did a bit of experimenting with cheese making a few years back. I still had that link in my favorites box.
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

patriceinil
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Re: Mozzarella Tutorial

Unread post by patriceinil » Tue Jan 02, 2018 10:26 am

I’ve dabbled in cheese making too but have gone back to just buying it already made. The video does a good job of explaining how to make mozzarella cheese.

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Icu4dzs
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Re: Mozzarella Tutorial

Unread post by Icu4dzs » Sat May 11, 2019 1:10 pm

WW has been making cheese for quite some time. When we were milking daily, we had more than enough for all kinds of cheese making, cream, butter, etc.
I made a cheese press for her but have recently discovered a guy who makes a press that is absolutely a work of art. His DW uses it to press herbs and things for "tinctures" of all sorts. She says when she is finished pressing all that is left is dry cellulose! I asked him to make one of those for WW and me.
Not sure if I told you but my beautiful Tinkerbell died this past winter. |em17| Buttercup is still at the farm where she was bred and hopefully, I'll get back a heifer and Buttercup to provide us with milk. My milking parlor (I built it in 2017) is fully appointed as best I could and when I was milking Tinkerbelle I was getting about 4 gallons/day from a cow with only 3 teats. |em8|
I am waiting to get Buttercup back and I'll let you know how that goes. I love my milk from the farm. Ever since starting to drink it, most of my "aches and pains" stopped! I can explain exactly why if anyone is interested.
Cheers,
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Farmfresh
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Re: Mozzarella Tutorial

Unread post by Farmfresh » Sat May 11, 2019 3:26 pm

I am interested! Anything that can help in the pain department ... me and my psoriatic arthritis are ALL ears.

And no, I didn't hear about Tinkerbell! How sad. |em17| What happened to her?
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

Old Fashioned
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Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2014 11:51 am

Re: Mozzarella Tutorial

Unread post by Old Fashioned » Sat May 11, 2019 9:37 pm

Make that two of us that are interested to hear.....please share your secret |em23|

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Icu4dzs
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Re: Mozzarella Tutorial

Unread post by Icu4dzs » Sun May 12, 2019 9:57 pm

OK, Good Evening Ladies,
This is NO secret but very few people ever seem to know about it until they go look it up themselves, BUT, a few weeks after I started milking Tinkerbelle, I said to WW one morning, "you know, I haven't been having much (any) back pain and sciatica lately. She said, "yeah, you aren't whining about it and come to think about it my knees aren't hurting as much as they used to. (I knew this because she was going up and down the stairs to the basement and she had avoided that like the plague for a long time!)
So I did a little research because the only thing that had changed was that we were drinking "raw" milk straight from our cow and had noticed this change.
It turns out that when cows are eating grass, they appear to produce a plant-based STEROID called Stigmasterol
Stigmasterol is a steroid derivative characterized by the hydroxyl group in position C-3 of the steroid skeleton, and unsaturated bonds in position 5-6 of the B ring, and position 22-23 in the alkyl substituent. Stigmasterol is found in the fats and oils of soybean, calabar bean and rape seed, as well as several other vegetables, legumes, nuts, seeds, and unpasteurized milk. Stigmasterol is a phytosterol, meaning it is steroid derived from plants. As a food additive, phytosterols have cholesterol-lowering properties (reducing cholesterol absorption in intestines), and may act in cancer prevention. Phytosterols naturally occur in small amount in vegetable oils, especially soybean oil. One such phytosterol complex, isolated from vegetable oil, is cholestatin, composed of campesterol, stigmasterol, and brassicasterol, and is marketed as a dietary supplement. Sterols can reduce cholesterol in human subjects by up to 15%.
(colloquially known as Wulzen after the lady physiologist at the U of Calif who discovered it.)
Summary: The facts behind the Wulzen factor—an important fat-soluble nutrient found in raw milk and sugarcane juice—have been lost to modern science. Also known as the “anti-stiffness factor” because it combats arthritis and relieves pain, swelling, and stiffness, the Wulzen factor was considered an actual vitamin by a number of early nutrition investigators, but it was never accepted as such by medical or government “authorities.” To acknowledge it would have required the admission that pasteurization of dairy products is a causative factor in arthritis, and such an admission would never be made by those who so vigorously promoted and enforced pasteurization laws. From Annual Review of Biochemistry, 1951. References

1. Dasler, W. Chicago Med. School Quart., 11, 70–73, 1950.
2. Dasler, W. and Bauer, C.D. Proc. Soc. Exptl. Biol. Med., 70, 134–35, 1949.
3. Harris, P.N., and Wulzen, R, Am. J. Path., 26, 595–615, 1950
4. Krueger, H., Wulzen, R., and Leveque, P. Abstracts Communs. 18th Intern. Physiol. Congr., 316–17, Copenhagen, 1950.
5. Lansbury, J., Smith, L.W., Wulzen, R., and van Wagtendonk, W.J. Ann. Rheumatic Diseases, 9, 97–108, 1950.
6. Oleson, J.J., Van Donk, E.C., Bernstein, S., Dorfman, L., and SubbaRow, Y. J. BioI. Chem., 171, 1–7, 1947.
7. Petering, H.G., Stubberfield, L., and Delor, R.A. Arch. Biochem., 18, 487–94, 1948.
8. Ross, L.E., van Wagtendonk, W.J., and Wulzen, R. Proc. Soc. Exptl. Biol. Med., 71, 281–83, 1949.
9. Weimar, V. and Wulzen, R. Federation Proc., 9, 134, 1950.
10. Wulzen, R. and Plympton, A.B. Proc. Soc. Exptl. BioI. Med., 72, 172–74, 1949.
11. Wulzen, R. and Plympton, A.B. Federation Proc., 8, 173, 1949.


I decided to apply Koch's Postulates to the situation and decided to see what would happen if I stopped drinking the milk and sure enough, the pain came back. I did some further reading on this stuff and found that it is HEAT LABILE which means it is inactivated by Pasteurization (which is why you don't get it in your store bought milk.) So,I started drinking it again and the pain resolved. Then I applied Koch's Postulates and pasteurized the milk to see if that had any effect on my aches and pains, and sure enough, the pain came back.

If you "Google" Wulzen Anti-stiffness factor, you will find enough reading to convince you that it is more than worth it to give this a try, particularly if you suffer from stiffness type ailments such as arthritis.

I hope you benefit from this information because it certainly made a difference in my life.

As a side note, to answer the question about Tinkerbelle, I really don't know what happened to her. I sent her to the Sunset Colony to get bred and while she was there, I am told she got into some "moldy feed" and she and one other cow died. I was devastated because she was such a prize. She was gentle, cooperative, and all round wonderful to know. I really miss her. |em17|

"So that's about all I have to say about that..."
Cheers,
Trim sends
You're believing it is not required for it to be true. TMM
Saepe Expertus, Semper Fidelis, Fratres Aeterni
Trim sends
//BT//

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