Bad Hay in Missouri

patriceinil
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Bad Hay in Missouri

Unread post by patriceinil » Wed Mar 06, 2019 4:44 pm


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Farmfresh
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Re: Bad Hay in Missouri

Unread post by Farmfresh » Wed Mar 06, 2019 8:11 pm

Usually, but not always this nitrogen poisoning comes when farmers feed cattle baled corn stalks. When hay prices are high and there is hay shortage there are a lot of baled corn stalks around too. Good article and good information.

Once again it is always best to know WHAT you are buying and who you buy it from, so you can ask the right questions. In this area most hay fields are not fertilized with chicken poo, because there are not many chicken farmers around. As a matter of a fact I think few farmers fertilize hay at all in this area. Southern Missouri is different. They have lots of commercial poultry producers and those places tend to get rid of their waste via selling it to farmers. Since most of it is too hot for the cultivated products it is typically spread on hay pastures.
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Old Fashioned
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Re: Bad Hay in Missouri

Unread post by Old Fashioned » Wed Mar 06, 2019 9:53 pm

I seen this and wondered about your sheep and other ruminants as well.

Unless I misunderstood the article,it would be a good practice to feed some corn along with hay to prevent poisoning from happening??? |em22|

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Farmfresh
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Re: Bad Hay in Missouri

Unread post by Farmfresh » Thu Mar 07, 2019 9:22 am

Yes extra carbs is the cure. Sad that today's GMO corn is considered more carb than protein.

Like I said before, it is important to know where your hay comes from and who grew it. This was an unheard of problem before factory farming. It is a problem of too much nitrogen in the soil when the forage crop is grown. As a gardener you know how we always struggle to keep the nitrogen up in the soil, because plants use it up when they grow. Nitrogen fertilizer is expensive, so while farmers WILL nitrogen dump a corn field to max the production (which is why this is most common in corn stalk bales) they won't spend that much money to nitrogen dump a hay field. The only way you get that much cheap nitrogen is if you take the clean out from factory farmed poultry to dump on your field.

Also, if you are doing that you are getting a lot more toxic waste than just the nitrogen hot poo. Typical commercial poultry farms also feed arsenic as a grow enhancer, antibiotics and other medical inputs that end up on the field along with the poultry manure. Heavy metal levels in the field will rise as well. Makes you realize what the meat is probably full of too.

As a person that has had horses all my life, I am a lot more aware and conscious of what good hay needs to be like. Equine digestion is very sensitive and so is their respiration. Hay with even a bit of mold can cause issues in both systems as can dusty hay. Their little tummys are sensitive to lots of different plants and weeds and nutritionally they have a huge need to fill.

Cows on the other hand are typically fed shear crap. Their digestive systems seem to be able to handle it. My cousin the doctor was married to a Missouri cattle farmer for many years. She used talk about what they fed "growers" (or young growing beef cattle) in the winter. One year they got access to a semi-truck load of peanut butter that did not pass inspection for human consumption. That winter they were grinding up the peanut butter with turkey litter (wood shavings, turkey poop and feathers) out of a local commercial turkey producers warehouse and feeding THAT mess to the cattle as winter feed. She was saying how all the tests came back with enough protein, fat and fiber to grow and fatten the cattle and it was so nice and CHEAP. Evidently the main things the peanut butter provided was extra fat and palatability, hiding the taste of the turkey poop. The litter itself provided most of the nutrition. Personally I don't want to eat meat that got much of its protein from turkey poop.
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
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Old Fashioned
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Re: Bad Hay in Missouri

Unread post by Old Fashioned » Thu Mar 07, 2019 9:29 am

But doesn't peanut butter have protein as well?

I don't blame you for not eating beef fed poop...….or is it poop fed beef? Whatever, it's still gross and very wrong.


I was looking around in Patrice's link and seen an article about 'fake' meat that is grown in a petri dish and can only think 'What in the heck is this world coming too'??? |em5|

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Farmfresh
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Re: Bad Hay in Missouri

Unread post by Farmfresh » Thu Mar 07, 2019 10:04 am

Yes, but turkey poop has more protein than peanuts. Concentrated. Full of those nitrites as well.
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

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