Pressure Canners

Low acid foods, like most veggies, ready made recipes and meats all require pressure canning to keep them safe.
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Farmfresh
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Re: Pressure Canners

Unread post by Farmfresh » Sat Apr 21, 2018 9:06 pm

You did a great job. I don't need to add much more. Watch some more of the canning videos on Our Half Acre Homestead's YouTube channel. She does a GREAT job of demonstrating how to load a canner. One thing I always did wrong was at the end of the canning time. I was always in a hurry to get the jars out. I would take of the jiggler and let the canner vent. BAD. When canning time is done, just turn off the heat and leave the canner alone until it goes down to zero on the pressure gauge or is cool with a jiggler. That cool down is also part of your processing time. Doing that you will have great luck.
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
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Re: Pressure Canners

Unread post by Farmfresh » Sat Apr 21, 2018 9:07 pm

Here is another pressure canning trick to share. A great way to fill up a canner that is not quite full... do some beans.



She cooks the beans at 15 pounds of pressure, because she lives in Idaho where the altitude is higher.
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

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Old Fashioned
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Re: Pressure Canners

Unread post by Old Fashioned » Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:12 pm

Well damn.......I didn't think of using a gas stove that I'm sure works differently than an electric. Mainly because when you change the heat setting or flame with a gas, the heat output is changed almost immediately whereas an electric takes a few minutes to readjust. And I'd bet there is even a difference between glass top vs coils. And currently I have the old coil electric stove. IMHO, I don't think glass tops put out as much heat as the coils in my experience. But still thank you Patrice for the info. You did answer some of my questions and I think it's good to know about gas as well. Just because hubs does have one of those 2 burner propane stoves that he did offer me for canning outside in the summer. I'm just not sure I'm ready for that yet, but still good to know.

I'll try to explain the process as I think I know it and hopefully ask the right questions in the right place. I am gonna pick you gals brains so hang on to your hats as this may be a very long post. If I miss anything or got it wrong or if there is an accepted alternate, please let me know.

Now.....I am pretty sure the times & poundages are easy to find anywhere. I do even have a couple of books with that info, but not the other details. I don't add salt when canning, so I hope that is ok.

To raw pack meat......just fill jars with raw meat. DO NOT ADD WATER cause it makes its own broth and salt is optional. Top with lids & bands. Put into canner with about 2 inches of water.
Does water have to be cold or can it be warm or tap hot? Is this the same method with beef or pork or bacon or ham as with chicken? What about fish? In all meats, how full do you pack? 1/2 a jar? 3/4? 2/3? Any differences with quarts?

To pack cooked or leftover meats (meat only, not recipes)....fill jar to within an inch(?) with meat and broth or water.

To raw pack veggies.....fill jar with veggies & boiling water(?) Or just any temp will do?

Some of my biggest questions about veggies is canning potatoes, sweet potatoes and pumpkin. Can these be canned as mashed or puree, or do they have to be left in chunks or pieces and jars filled with water?

I know it's easy to do fruits as well in a PC, but is there any differences from WB other than timing?



Once the jars are in the canner, you lock on the lid......is the burner on already? Or do you do a cold start? If I understood Patrice correctly she does a cold start with raw packed but does a hot pack with the burner on already? Or just with hot water in the canner, without the burner on??? Which is to say a cold start is to not turn on the burner until after you lock down the lid...yes? no? Does anyone do it differently???


Once you're locked down and the burner is on.......do you have the burner set on high until it vents steam??? Or do you do it more slowly at say a medium high or other setting??? When it's venting there is no pressure build up until after you put on the jiggler??? Do you lower the heat at any time before adding or as you add the jiggler??? If I understood correctly, to keep the heat on high even after adding the jiggler until it gets to the correct pressure/poundage, then turn it down to keep it stable, then start timing.

I think this is where I get the most confused about the heat settings. Cause if that is correct, having the heat on high until correct pressure is reached, then turning it down.....to me seems as if the pressure would continue to climb higher even after the temp is adjusted lower.....atleast for a period of time. Now it may be different for the gas stove, but on an electric coil burner I know it would take a longer time before it corrected......and if I'm not mistaken this is exactly where I had so much trouble years before.

Here is where I need to know exactly what adjustments to the heat are made, what temp setting? Not to just turn it down, but down to what? Also.......is it possible to do it more slowly? Like turning on the burner to medium and just going from there? Or would that take hours to get to pressure? Another question in here is time......how long on average does it take to get the pressure to stabilize, how long does it take to correct the pressure once the heat has changed?
I'm thinking about after adding the jiggler and turning down the heat....how long does it take? Just in case it should only take 5 minutes to correct itself and it's taking mine 20 minutes or the other way around.

Sorry gals but these are the details that seem to escape me. They weren't in the instruction book and neither are they on youtube. I need to know........

Once your jars are in the canner, turn the heat to 10 or high and when steam escapes the vent, time it for 10 minutes. Put on the jiggler and immediately turn down the heat to 6/7 or medium high and let it build up to pressure. This should take about 10 minutes. About the time your pressure is 9lbs turn down the heat to 4 medium low for it all to level out at 10lbs, now start your processing time (20 minutes?) At the 15 minute mark you can turn off the burner as the pressure will still be hot enough to finish off the last 5 minutes and beyond to full cool down. Once your canner is cool (about an hour after turning off the heat) it's safe to open & unload the canner.

Sorry, not sure the added short cuts in there are true or not, but I think you get the idea of the info I'm looking for. And yes unfortunately I do need to keep rehashing this, turning it one way then another and back again......before I have it locked into my brain...and even then I may ask again, just to be sure.

ok, at this point my brain is now fried so no more questions....until another time :grin:

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Farmfresh
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Re: Pressure Canners

Unread post by Farmfresh » Sun Apr 22, 2018 6:22 am

First ....



Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

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Farmfresh
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Re: Pressure Canners

Unread post by Farmfresh » Sun Apr 22, 2018 7:16 am

Old Fashioned wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:12 pm
Well damn.......I didn't think of using a gas stove that I'm sure works differently than an electric. Mainly because when you change the heat setting or flame with a gas, the heat output is changed almost immediately whereas an electric takes a few minutes to readjust. And I'd bet there is even a difference between glass top vs coils. And currently I have the old coil electric stove. IMHO, I don't think glass tops put out as much heat as the coils in my experience. But still thank you Patrice for the info. You did answer some of my questions and I think it's good to know about gas as well. Just because hubs does have one of those 2 burner propane stoves that he did offer me for canning outside in the summer. I'm just not sure I'm ready for that yet, but still good to know.
You definitely have more rapid control of heat with a gas stove as compared to an electric stove. If you are worried about reducing the temperature just bring the temperature up slower. You can turn it off and on and adjust it up and down some until you get the pressure right, just don't start timing the batch until you get the pressure to the correct place and stable.
Old Fashioned wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:12 pm
To pack cooked or leftover meats (meat only, not recipes)....fill jar to within an inch(?) with meat and broth or water.
Yup. The jar is filled to the same level whether raw pack or cooked. The raw pack is just packed tight together and the cooked meat is filled more loosely then topped up with the broth.

HEAD SPACE at the top of a jar is important. Too much may interfere with the product and will definitely effect storage times. In the video above Michigan Snow Pony canned one jar that was only half full. It will can fine, but should be used fairly quickly, because it just won't last as long.

Different products need different head space and this rule goes across the board with canning. Meats and beans you leave about an inch. Most other stuff it is about the same. Sauces (whether apple or tomato) you generally leave about 1/2 inch of space. Fruit and pickles are the same. Jellies and jams are the least at about 1/4 inch of head space. It is easy to look up if you can't remember.
Old Fashioned wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:12 pm
To raw pack veggies.....fill jar with veggies & boiling water(?) Or just any temp will do?
Any temp will do with raw pack. Many people use hot water to hurry the process of heating the jars along.
Old Fashioned wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:12 pm
Some of my biggest questions about veggies is canning potatoes, sweet potatoes and pumpkin. Can these be canned as mashed or puree, or do they have to be left in chunks or pieces and jars filled with water?
Potatoes, sweet potatoes and pumpkin should be canned in chunks. This allows more even heating within the jar. It also makes re-heating at supper time easier. Think of trying to heat up mashed potatoes on the stove top. They scorch on the bottom and are cold in the middle. Having cooked potatoes in chunks with a bit of water reheat evenly and fast. Just can them up, open the jar and reheat then you can mash them easily with a potato masher when you ready to eat. It gives you a chance to add the butter in as well.
Old Fashioned wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:12 pm
I know it's easy to do fruits as well in a PC, but is there any differences from WB other than timing?
I tried fruit in the pressure canner. YUCK. They become mush. I much prefer water bathing my fruits. BTW ... you can use the pressure canner to do water bath canning... just don't lock down the lid. Instead use it like you would any pan lid or use another pan lid that fits.
Old Fashioned wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:12 pm
Once the jars are in the canner, you lock on the lid......is the burner on already? Or do you do a cold start? If I understood Patrice correctly she does a cold start with raw packed but does a hot pack with the burner on already? Or just with hot water in the canner, without the burner on??? Which is to say a cold start is to not turn on the burner until after you lock down the lid...yes? no? Does anyone do it differently???
I typically turn the heat on under the canner ... just to get the water heating started up. If it is going to take a long time to get my jars ready I will just leave it off until they are all in there. Once the jars are in (be sure they are on a rack or trivet or something and not just sitting directly on the bottom of the canner) and water is in, then I shut up the lid leaving the vent open. With the All American you tighten the lid bolts on evenly by tightening opposite bolts... like you do lug nuts on a car tire. If you tighten around the pot you will get the lid on crooked.
Old Fashioned wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:12 pm
Once you're locked down and the burner is on.......do you have the burner set on high until it vents steam??? Or do you do it more slowly at say a medium high or other setting??? When it's venting there is no pressure build up until after you put on the jiggler??? Do you lower the heat at any time before adding or as you add the jiggler??? If I understood correctly, to keep the heat on high even after adding the jiggler until it gets to the correct pressure/poundage, then turn it down to keep it stable, then start timing.
Yup. You can heat it slower if you want to. Basically at this point you are just boiling water in the pot. There is no pressure build up until you lock it down with the jiggler. Let the canner vent steam for about 10 minutes. This exhausts extra air from the jars as well as the canner itself. Hot air takes up more space than cold air does. Blow up a balloon then take it out in the cold or put it in the freezer for a bit and watch. When it comes out in the heat it expands again.

Just fiddle with it until you get the pressure stable then start timing. Once the pot heats up and the pressure is stable it takes very little heat to maintain it. Like the wood stove. It takes a while to get hot, but keeping it hot is easy.
Old Fashioned wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:12 pm
I think this is where I get the most confused about the heat settings. Cause if that is correct, having the heat on high until correct pressure is reached, then turning it down.....to me seems as if the pressure would continue to climb higher even after the temp is adjusted lower.....atleast for a period of time. Now it may be different for the gas stove, but on an electric coil burner I know it would take a longer time before it corrected......and if I'm not mistaken this is exactly where I had so much trouble years before.

Here is where I need to know exactly what adjustments to the heat are made, what temp setting? Not to just turn it down, but down to what? Also.......is it possible to do it more slowly? Like turning on the burner to medium and just going from there? Or would that take hours to get to pressure? Another question in here is time......how long on average does it take to get the pressure to stabilize, how long does it take to correct the pressure once the heat has changed?
I'm thinking about after adding the jiggler and turning down the heat....how long does it take? Just in case it should only take 5 minutes to correct itself and it's taking mine 20 minutes or the other way around.

Sorry gals but these are the details that seem to escape me. They weren't in the instruction book and neither are they on youtube. I need to know........

Once your jars are in the canner, turn the heat to 10 or high and when steam escapes the vent, time it for 10 minutes. Put on the jiggler and immediately turn down the heat to 6/7 or medium high and let it build up to pressure. This should take about 10 minutes. About the time your pressure is 9lbs turn down the heat to 4 medium low for it all to level out at 10lbs, now start your processing time (20 minutes?) At the 15 minute mark you can turn off the burner as the pressure will still be hot enough to finish off the last 5 minutes and beyond to full cool down. Once your canner is cool (about an hour after turning off the heat) it's safe to open & unload the canner.
Just leave the heat on and the pressure stable until the entire time is up. Don't try to save 5 minutes of heat. It is just not worth it if the pressure drops too quickly for some reason. Yup. Once it is cooled down (by its self) it is safe to open. Often the jars are still boiling.

Like I said above you are basically just heating a pot of water. You can do it however fast or slow you want. Once you add the jiggler the pressure begins to build. The jiggler is weighted so that it jiggles ever few seconds (several times a minute) If it just keeps jiggling it is letting out the extra pressure and may need to be turned down ever so slightly. Most new canners have a pressure gauge AND a jiggler. There is also an emergency pressure valve on the canner. It is made of soft lead or rubber and designed to pop open and vent steam if ever the canner gets too high of a pressure inside. I have seem my grandma blow one. (an un watched pot does boil!) It just shot steam straight up and made a mess in the kitchen, but no heads were lost. If you ever blow up an emergency valve they have to be replaced with a new one before you can can again.
Old Fashioned wrote:
Sat Apr 21, 2018 11:12 pm
Sorry, not sure the added short cuts in there are true or not, but I think you get the idea of the info I'm looking for. And yes unfortunately I do need to keep rehashing this, turning it one way then another and back again......before I have it locked into my brain...and even then I may ask again, just to be sure.

ok, at this point my brain is now fried so no more questions....until another time :grin:
Remember you don't have to start off expert. Just learn what you need for ONE batch. Jump in and do it. Then keep learning as you go.

|em25|
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

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Farmfresh
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Re: Pressure Canners

Unread post by Farmfresh » Sun Apr 22, 2018 7:17 am

Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

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Old Fashioned
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Re: Pressure Canners

Unread post by Old Fashioned » Sun Apr 22, 2018 10:57 am

Farm......I assure you that if I kept rehashing all this info, asking the same questions over & over on a daily basis for a year or even 10 years, I still wouldn't consider myself an expert. Just jump in & learn as you go you say???? Some things in life I agree that's the way to go, but not with pressure canning.......this is how afraid I am. Remember, I had tried that 'wing it' once before and whatever fear I had had before that, quickly turned into a phobia that has doubled or tripled over the years since, just because I didn't get right back up on that horse. Once bitten, twice shy.

As for letting it get to temp/poundage slower.........can I just turn it on say medium and leave it there from heat up, vent, jiggle on, pressure build and stable, processing time???? Unless of course after a period of time it goes too high or too low and just adjust the temp from there??? Meaning less dramatic change in heat & pressure??? Only problem with this is the overall time it takes to do one batch. Maybe you can do 2 or 10 batches in one day, but if I did it this way (if it's safe to do so) I could only do one batch per day.???

Another thought......some ladies I used to work with years ago, when I tried & failed pressure canning 101.....they said they do their stuff at a higher poundage for less time and still get safe quality product. Like green beans or other veggies.....they would do them at 15lbs of pressure for like 5 minutes, instead of 10lbs for 20(?) or whatever the time is. Is this possible and/or common??? It's not that I would do that, or in the beginning anyway.....but it would be good to know. Remember, when I do something new, even just cooking a new recipe I do go by the directions explicitly for the first several times in the beginning.......I don't start experimenting or changing anything until I am very comfortable with the standard. So no worries about me doing something against the standard without knowing what to expect.


And last night after I had posted the 20 questions quiz, I did go back to YouTube and watched another gazillion videos, trying to find answers to the above questions. OY in every one I watched, there were some parts that I needed/wanted to know but were skipped over for time sake. Any explanation given for the lapse didn't include the details I was looking for and it's very frustrating. As I said above, I've got the most of it down, but where I get freaked is the heat settings, times or stages of adjustment, yada yada. I was expecting a uniform answer across the board and I finally realized and one video did touch on.....every stove is different, even the products to be canned are done differently.....so there is NO uniformity for the info I seek. That one video also said to do a dry run, just to see how it all works together (stove & canner). Just put some water in the canner with no jars......go thru the whole process as if you were canning something and do this a few times until you figure out the when, where, how on your stove with your canner. Now that made the most sense to me EVER. I would still be shaking like a leaf, but somehow it doesn't seem quite as scary doing a dry run vs a full load.

Oh, another thing........canning dry beans??? I have been hearing a lot about putting 1/2 C raw dry beans into a pint jar with the remainder filled with water or broth to 1 inch headspace, then processed.......the final product is a pint full of cooked beans to just heat & eat or throw into a quick recipe........just saying


Now......earlier this last week I had started about 6 gallons of chicken bone broth. After it cooked down about half, I strained & canned some up (yes in my trusty WB) and got 7 qts & 7 pts. The remainder of the broth was put into the crockpot to cook down for the bouillon experiment. Anyway, those jars as I took them out of the canner were still boiling inside the jars and did so for quite some time afterward (20-30 minutes). BUT the lids kept popping several times before finally popping into place for the seal (all within 3-4 minutes) and yes every one of them did seal and this does happen frequently, especially with broth. I'm just wondering if anyone else has that happen to them when canning anything. To have the lids pop several times before sealing????? |em22|

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Old Fashioned
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Re: Pressure Canners

Unread post by Old Fashioned » Sun Apr 22, 2018 11:06 am

BTW......... |em26| the lady in the first video with her scare tactics....I would not believe that for a second and can't imagine how she did that with a straight face. I may be a scaredy cat, but I'm not crazy.......well, not in that way |em29|

patriceinil
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Re: Pressure Canners

Unread post by patriceinil » Sun Apr 22, 2018 11:19 am

DO NOT, I repeat DO NOT can at a higher pressure for less time than the manual says too!!!! You WILL NOT kill the toxic spores and can get very sick from eating things canned that way.

As for the rest of your post/questions I’ll have to come back later when I have more time to reply.

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