Foraging for Wild Edible Plants

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House Sparrow
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Re: Foraging for Wild Edible Plants

Unread post by House Sparrow » Tue May 26, 2015 8:12 pm

I think purslane has tiny yellow flowers. I learned to cook that up with other finely chopped veggies and put it on a taco.
The round leaved green with the white flowers is miner's lettuce. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claytonia_perfoliata
right now we have what I call wild spinach but I think it is commonly known as Lambs Quarters and also another wild amaranth growing in abundance. It usually grows earlier in the season, but I guess our lack of rain prevented it from sprouting sooner.

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calendula
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Re: Foraging for Wild Edible Plants

Unread post by calendula » Fri Jun 12, 2015 10:30 am

I was nibbling on some lamb's quarter last night while I was doing some weeding, along with my kale. I let Lily try a lamb's quarter leaf, and she spit it out and said, "Yucky!" :lol: I guess it was too bitter for her.

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Farmfresh
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Re: Foraging for Wild Edible Plants

Unread post by Farmfresh » Fri Jun 12, 2015 12:21 pm

D1 has always been a big grazer of the wild. She was teaching the Kid to eat the wild violet flowers the other day. He was munching so many that his mom (D2) did the old "you are going to spoil your supper" speech. :smile:

D1 asked her how he could spoil his supper by eating wild vegetables. |em12|
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

dizzy
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Re: Foraging for Wild Edible Plants

Unread post by dizzy » Fri Jun 12, 2015 7:26 pm

Violets look really pretty in a salad.

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House Sparrow
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Re: Foraging for Wild Edible Plants

Unread post by House Sparrow » Thu Sep 24, 2015 5:10 pm

Our wild plants to harvest now are walnuts and acorns. I keep wanting to make acorn flour, but I haven't been able to find enough acorns without worm holes. The walnut tree that is next door has lots of walnuts, but the crows and rats are getting them before they fall. There was a tree at the community garden, but it got cut down a few weeks ago. That is where I got my walnuts for the past 3 years. Now will have to find another tree. It might be a fun activity to go out and find one, where I would be able to harvest. Unfortunately they keep being cut down. No-one sees the value in them. Maybe it is too much work for people to shell them. |em2|

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Farmfresh
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Re: Foraging for Wild Edible Plants

Unread post by Farmfresh » Fri Sep 25, 2015 1:22 am

Are they black walnuts Sparrow? We have three or four black walnut trees here. Unfortunately they are ALL located actually IN the fence lines. One of them is broken nearly in half, but still alive, and hanging over my western fence line. It is going to have to go soon. Two are in the back fence row that I have been working on. I went back and fixed the fence by this one a bit different. Before the fence was actually grown into the tree trunk. Now I have a little jog out that goes around the trunk. It isn't fixed in this pic yet, but you can see the tree.

Image

The old farm house that was originally part of this property and used to belong to my best friend in Junior High school has about 8 mature black walnut trees that are beautiful and planted properly on that farm. I am sure the ones that we have around here were all squirrel planted.

Around here there are also several black walnut collection sites. Places where you can SELL your gathered nuts for a good price. This year they are going for 14 cents a pound hulled at Hammons. http://www.black-walnuts.com/2015/ Black walnuts don't take very many to equal a pound either. Pretty good way to make actual cash from foraging. There are some scout troupes and such that pick up nuts as a money raiser. Lots of people have trees that totally go to waste. Including mine usually. |em28| D2 is allergic to black walnuts and the rest of us really don't like them much. I am MUCH more a pecan gal.

ANYONE interested in foraging for nuts of any type should invest in a Nut Wizard. http://www.nutwizard.com/ There are lots of knock offs, but this one really works well.

Back in the day my best friends mom, who we called Mama Bear, always made the best use of her walnut harvest. The kids collected pound and pounds of the nuts and poured them into the gravel driveway where their jeep did the job of hulling. Then the kids (6 of them) all gathered around an old anvil with a hammer and broke the shells. Many hours were spent before the TV picking out the nut meats and putting them into sorted containers. One for almost whole or whole nuts and another for the busted bits. At Christmas time friends and family got BIG jars of picked nut meats for Christmas, usually along with a loaf or two of pumpkin or zucchini bread that also contained the walnuts. What a royal gift!
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

dizzy
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Re: Foraging for Wild Edible Plants

Unread post by dizzy » Fri Sep 25, 2015 6:07 am

When I move my horses, I'll have 2 black walnut trees in the field. I have never eaten black walnuts, but I like English walnuts and pecans. They're all in the same family, so I think I'll probably like these. I plan on picking them out of my field.

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House Sparrow
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Re: Foraging for Wild Edible Plants

Unread post by House Sparrow » Fri Oct 02, 2015 11:11 pm

We have both black walnuts here and english walnuts. I prefer the English walnuts. It is easier to get the meat out and there is more of it. Unfortunately they cut down the English walnut tree at the community garden. Now I need to find another good tree. Assoc's neighbor has one, but the rats, squirrels and crows get most of them. Then our own dogs love them too and it takes a lot of time of picking up lots of walnuts to get any that heve not already ben chewed on by something.
The acorns from Assoc's neighbor usually have worms in them. They were great, when I had lizards.

I used to get my English walnuts from an empty lot. But those were cut down to put in a building for Rite Aid a few years ago.
Unfortunately our local parks do not allow picking anything. I still see some people foraging. But I can see why they don't want us too. The parks would be stripped bare.

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Patience
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Re: Foraging for Wild Edible Plants

Unread post by Patience » Thu Aug 01, 2019 9:14 am

Test post. See if I have figured out how to post photos. Please let me know if there are problems with image size and I will resize pictures before posting?

Great thread! We enjoy chickweed, purslane, dandelions, poke and lambs quarter but had no idea green briars are edible! Thanks for that Sunsaver! We have quite a crop of them and nothing tames an “invasive” like eating it!

Not tried the common dock as greens, but we sure will! Read that burdock shoots (the common cockle-burr) are steamed and considered a delicacy in Japan but we haven’t found enough of those to make a mess yet.

That nut wizard looks like a great help Farmfresh, thanks for sharing! Might be just the thing for MIL, she has lots of black walnuts - and shares nicely.

I like the young passionflower shoots very much and may have killed ours, snapping them off and eating them on the spot...

We got a mushroom book and started searching in earnest a couple years ago. Just the very safe ones! Couple weeks ago we got a really nice crop of chanterelles!



We saute them lightly in butter or ghee and freeze excess. Read that they don’t dry well but we like them very much frozen this way!

We also enjoy hen of the woods, they get big enough to be a nice haul! I adore puffballs but hubby isn’t quite as crazy about them. I slice them and saute in butter and freeze any leftovers. We always saved some of the dried up puffballs to dust on minor injuries.

We make salves with chickweed. Extract dried mullein flowers in oil. Make pesto and tea with our “invasive” purple perilla, use it as a fresh herb too.

Tending it now, the perilla that is, trying to get enough for a mess of perilla greens. Pruning it to get plants to bush. We want to dry a pile of it since we made tea for a cold and found it gave us relief!

Studies show it to be anti inflammatory a d antihistamine. It tastes a LOT better than feverfew, the only other antihistamine I have been able to find to grow in our zone!

We did not plant the perilla. It just showed up. It IS considered an invasive (it is a mint!) and can be toxic to livestock. We harvest before it goes to seed and still have plenty...

Lots of info about it here:

https://www.theartofhealing.com.au/herbs-perilla.html

Sparing you the actual studies. How they get that info is often more than I want to know!

Got a shot of out purple perilla growing with lambs quarter. May just try a little mess cooked together with some onions.



We made a pesto with 2 cups of packed perilla leaves, 1 cup pistachios, 1/4 cup parmesan and enough avocado oil to make a thick paste (couple tablespoons over a half cup of oil, about) of it all in a food processor. Froze it in cube containers, as we do all our herb pestos. Got about two cups total.



Perilla is also called shiso, which fits on a label better. It comes in green as well as purple.

We find our perilla tastes kind of cinnamony though people often say it tastes like citrus. The pesto tastes earthy, we love it! Eating yummy pesto has got to be more fun than taking allergy medicine!

Identification and other info here:

http://www.eattheweeds.com/perilla/

Note that we apparently have a “ruffled” variety, ours looks like an escaped ornamental. The square stem, flowers and smell gave us a positive id.

If it would be better to start a new thread please do say so? I have been scolded for digging up old threads on other forums before but I have not seen that looking around here?

Rhodie Ranch
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Re: Foraging for Wild Edible Plants

Unread post by Rhodie Ranch » Thu Aug 01, 2019 10:56 am

no! Don't start a new thread! Some of us miss our old friends, who've posted on this thread, so it was great to see their names again.

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