Uses of LOCAL honey

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Icu4dzs
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Uses of LOCAL honey

Unread post by Icu4dzs » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:38 am

As one who had numerous environmental allergies prior to coming to my new home N of 45, I discovered the medicinal qualities of LOCAL honey. Why I emphasize LOCAL is because the pollens that are predominantly the "culprit" in respiratory system allergies are generally "processed" by the bees in that area. To that end, I found that including local honey (which is often much more expensive than the stuff you find in the stores from China, etc.) in my diet diminished my allergy problems to essentially nil over the period of about 2 years.

I realize that some will look askance at what I am saying here but even though my "N of only 1" was successful, I decided to add another subject to my study. My DD1 who came here with a nearly steady diet of Benadryl (10 ml/dose/day) has not had any need for Benadryl since the early part of her stay and now that she is staying with her mother for the "6 months" she admits that her need for Benadryl has NOT returned. She is also getting the "local honey" there at my insistence. Honey is a much cheaper medication than Benadryl and much less toxic... |em3|

My point here is that it is my "professional opinion" that many of the "intolerances" we notice in our lives are to a great extent, caused by locally available things, most of which are related to what we eat. As I looked at the list of topics in this section, I notice many of those issues. Egg intolerance, Milk (lactose?) intolerance, Gluten intolerance and the list goes on.

There are some important issues to consider here.

First, we should consider our diet as children. We those things causative of "Intolerance" then or has this become an issue of adult life?
Second, we should also consider that almost ALL intolerances (allergies) are caused by a PROTEIN of one sort or another. There are of course, exceptions to this "rule" (iodine" comes to mind) but then even iodine is a critical component of the thyroid gland function.

The point I am trying to make is that it is wholly conceivable that if many of these intolerances can be acquired, they can also be "eliminated." The use of the local honey in my case is a good example of this.

For those who are intolerant of eggs, ask yourself if they are store bought from who knows where, or are they laid by chickens who eat what YOU feed them in your own environment? Does your milk come from WHEREVER or is it the product of the cows either on your farm/homestead or locally produced?

As we all know, we expect things to "change" (and not for the better) as noted by St. John of Patmos. To that end, we also need to understand that our food sources are going to change (hopefully for the better) and that we may have the ability to eliminate the "foreign food sources" that cause many of our "intolerance" problems.

I am not saying that this is a panacea or a "cure all" but I am saying we should examine our food sources and see what our body is telling us about things that come with "whatever they put in it from wherever they get it. " Folks in other countries (e.g. China) may have things in it to which we would NEVER be exposed if that food had been produced here in the USA. I refer to "NIGHT SOIL" as a specific issue. We all know that none of us use that because we have learned that this causes issues that are absolutely KNOWN to bring about disease-causing effects.

One of the things I also learned by having a milk cow is that I haven't been having pain from arthritis since starting to drink raw, locally produced milk. This is NOT an unknown phenomenon but isn't considered because our own FDA has never considered the effects of their own good intentions in the inclusion or exclusion of things that have been proven in the past to cause disease. Milk production is an excellent example.

We all know that there are a number of diseases associated with drinking raw milk in situations where the cows were not kept clean, the milking equipment was a questionably dirty wooden bucket. cleanliness of the person milking the cow (hand washing, etc.?), the total cleanliness issue of the equipment and the refrigeration/storage issues were unsanitary as well. Admittedly, none of us would be here if everyone who drank raw milk for the past 5000 years had died from these diseases so we have to consider the changes we have learned about as having contributed to the safety of our system.

To that end, I would propose that when anyone suffers from any of the "food intolerances/allergies" that they examine several issues before condemning that food substance in their own particular lives. Yes, there are "inborn errors of metabolism" that can not be diminished but those particular problems often result in death of the individual before reaching adulthood, sometimes before reaching puberty.

If things are going to "go south" we are going to have to resort to eating what is locally available and the thought of NOT having adequate nutrition because of "intolerances" to specific foods will result in serious nutritional deficiency's and can lead to early death (assuming that "man-made" factors don't do that first!)

Think about these things and let's see if there aren't some of these issues that can be eliminated by removing the environmental impurities from other places that have crept into our food sources that are causing some of these problems!

I will admit that this is NOT going to solve ALL OUR PROBLEMS, but I honestly believe it will be a good start for an approach to the solution.
Cheers,
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Farmfresh
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Re: Uses of LOCAL honey

Unread post by Farmfresh » Wed Jan 15, 2020 9:52 am

Wise words once again Doc.

Raw local honey is much like a vaccine of sorts. Preparing the body for the pollens in that area. And what a YUMMY vaccine!

You also bring up the raw milk. Which acts similarly.

Proteins are VERY significant and how our body breaks them down and make use of them is paramount. If you don't digest and make use of your food ... for what ever reason ... the entire body is compromised.

Living with Celiac, I now realize that a huge part of why I have issues with my teeth is most likely due to gut absorption issues as a child while I was developing my teeth. At that point I was eating a typical diet that included wheat cereals and bread, while MY body evidently does not genetically have the ability to produce the enzymes that break down that particular protein. I spent my childhood iron anemic - even though I ate almost every breakfast from a cast iron pan. When your body is reacting and inflamed you don't get the nutrient you NEED no matter what you eat.

And such a subtle protein change can make ALL of the difference. It is really a developing branch of science.

SO many people that are allergic to "eggs" for example, find that if they change the egg they may eliminate the allergy completely. There are lots of birds that lay eggs that we eat. Chickens, ducks, quail, geese and even ostrich. All are slightly different in there protein makeup and that slight difference can make a world of difference!
Some people can't tolerate the protein variety found in a chicken egg, but they may be able to eat a duck egg perfectly with no issues. And ... duck eggs are possibly even different within that group. Muscovy ducks are a completely different duck variety than the typical Mallard which most farm ducks are descended from. It is possible that a person could eat a Muscovy egg with no issue and actually be allergic to an egg from a Pekin or Runner duck.

Milk is the same way. We have understood for centuries that some people CAN drink goats milk, but react to cow milk and vice versa. However the fairly recent discovery of the A1 milk protein vs the A2 milk protein has made some amazing changes in some diets. Most commercial milk cows produce the A1 protein in their milk, but the OLD WORLD heritage breeds of cattle, such as the Jersey often produce the completely different A2 protein. Now some dairies are testing their cows and specializing in the A2 type of milk. (at a premium price)

And that is just ONE line of the Bovidae Bos genetic lineup, Domestic Cow - Bos taurus. Most likely other Bovines ... like Yaks - Bos grunniens, Gayal cattle - Bos frontalis, Banteng cattle - Bos javanicus ... ALL still the genus Bos and considered cows. I don't think it has been studied yet, but they probably also ALL carry a different variety of the milk protein. And that does not get into the cousin genus species ... like the centuries old domesticated Water buffalo varieties - Bubalus arnee (carabanesis and bubalis). Both of those are used for milk and cheese in other parts of the world. Or even American BISON.
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
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Re: Uses of LOCAL honey

Unread post by Old Fashioned » Wed Jan 15, 2020 11:34 pm

As a child, I was allergic to so many things.....rubbing alcohol, paint, soaps, perfumes, bee stings, mosquito bites, starch in raw potatoes, acidic foods/fruits and the list goes on. Then I had my first child and everything changed. Much of those things no longer bothered me and those that do, the response it minimal in comparison. I had eventually attributed the allergies to the stress of an abusive childhood AKA an emotional response.
Sometimes now I break out in hives, or severe itching but I now tend to think it may be liver related, and unfortunately I don't think Medicare will cover for enough testing to be done to find out for sure.

Anyway, as we've talked before.....my #2 son is/was anaphylactic to honey bees (or so the greedy specialist said...the jury is still out on that call). BUT years ago, he got on a honey kick and insisted on having it on just about everything he ate. He did this for probably atleast a year. We still don't know if he's still allergic or not because he hasn't been stung since and that may be due to him finally figuring out not to play with them or get them mad.
Also, because his & my temperament are like butting heads on a constant basis, especially when he was younger.....I am wondering about his allergy also being an emotional reaction. |em22|

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Farmfresh
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Re: Uses of LOCAL honey

Unread post by Farmfresh » Thu Jan 16, 2020 8:02 am

Another reason to source LOCAL honey is that a lot of honey on the market today is NOT honey. China has found ways to slip past the testing with sugar based syrup blended with honey.
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

dizzy
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Re: Uses of LOCAL honey

Unread post by dizzy » Fri Feb 21, 2020 6:19 am

Another thing that honey is good for is wounds. It has antibacterial properties.

Just remember, honey cannot be given to young children. I forget the age where it's considered safe for them.

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Re: Uses of LOCAL honey

Unread post by Icu4dzs » Fri Feb 21, 2020 11:58 am

The literature says one year of age but I would wait until at least three or four years of age.
The problem is caused by infantile botulism. The clostridium botulinum spores can get into the honey and get into the gastrointestinal tract of babies at an early age. Sometimes it requires long periods of mechanical ventilation to keep them alive because of the neurotoxins involved. I think the death rate is about 2% in those conditions.
Just my $.02
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Re: Uses of LOCAL honey

Unread post by Old Fashioned » Fri Feb 21, 2020 12:43 pm

Ah geeeeezzz……...I remember as a kid, the new mothers in the family would dip the bottle nipple or the pacifier in honey and give to the babies, in certain circumstances. Like when the baby had colic, upset tummies or otherwise wouldn't calm down or eat. They didn't do that all the time, just when having baby troubles. None of the babies had ever suffered ill effects from the honey. That was all pre-1980's.


I've been more interested in using honey on a regular basis and possibly replacing sugar altogether in my coffee or tea or other frequent uses. But the costs of local honey sold at farms, produce stands and other sources are expensive to say the least and because of that, I've been slow to change over. Then yesterday I seen a gal with a table set up along the road with a sign of selling 'local raw honey' that got me to re-thinking the issue.

Unfortunately I didn't have time to stop to find out more, BUT I am wondering the safety of this type operation??? What I mean is......just how 'wrong' can raw honey be? As in comparison to 'raw milk'? I mean raw milk has to be retrieved from the animal in a clean environment, clean tools, cold storage, etc, etc for it to be considered 'safe'...…..regardless of private sales or government controlled commercial sales. IOW, I wouldn't buy raw milk from just any stranger no matter how much I wanted the milk. I'd have to have some kind of proof or trust of the product and people handling it. But I'm asking here, if honey is similar? Or is it more safe to consume, with only minimal 'proper handling'???

Am I making any kind of sense here???? |em22|

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Re: Uses of LOCAL honey

Unread post by Icu4dzs » Fri Feb 21, 2020 2:50 pm

Honey is a very different issue then Raw milk. I will admit that raw milk has some risks if the person who is obtaining the raw milk is not scrupulously using clean and hygienic technique. That having been said raw honey is very different and I would imagine there is really no reason why you couldn’t have all the raw honey you want without any real problem.

As I said, I would not give it to babies and I understand why you said what you did about putting it on the nipple but just the same I think it’s better to not give it to babies because of the clostridium botulinum exposure and their G.I. track being unable to deal with it.

There are just too many variables to buy things from people that you don’t know exactly how they are doing the things they are doing in order to obtain those elements. For that reason, I think I would just trust only what I do myself.
Hope you are well.
Trim sends
Your believing it is not required for it to be true. TMM
I'd rather have it and not need it, than need it and NOT have it!
Saepe Expertus, Semper Fidelis, Fratres Aeterni
Trim sends
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Farmfresh
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Re: Uses of LOCAL honey

Unread post by Farmfresh » Fri Feb 21, 2020 4:49 pm

When I buy honey I much prefer buying at Farmer's Markets from the bee keeper. I ask questions that only real bee keepers would know, so I even test them before I buy. Evidently there is a lot of FAKE honey on the market. Imported in bulk from China and basically sugar syrup tweaked to resemble honey.
Matthew 19:26 Jesus looked at them and said, "With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible."
"Stop Dreaming About the Good Life and Start Living IT !"
Every little bit ... is a little bit.

dizzy
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Re: Uses of LOCAL honey

Unread post by dizzy » Fri Feb 21, 2020 6:16 pm

We have a few places around here that sell honey. I will admit that at times I've wondered if the honey all comes from their bees.

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