Living Up NORTH - Challenges and Strategies for Success

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Old Fashioned
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Re: Living Up NORTH - Challenges and Strategies for Success

Unread post by Old Fashioned » Sat Jan 18, 2020 3:52 pm

Rhodie Ranch wrote:
Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:19 am
Medford OR had snow the day after I left. It shut down schools, closed roads, and 18K lost electricity. Three inches....

I've been thinking of a wood stove, but they are not allowed in many developments. If I had a pellet stove, it would take electricity. A gas fireplace as I'm on natural gas for the furnace, but does it take electricity? Slightly off topic, but these thoughts have gone thru my mind given what is happening back home.
As for the pellet stove, not only does it take electricity but also parts do break down. We had one for several years, until the auger that fed the pellets to the fire went out & we had to order another from MO that took 3 weeks to arrive...…..all this during the coldest December in many years. Boys & I would huddle under the covers in bed or sit in the car with the heater full blast, even with layers of clothes, plus eating at restaurants. By the following summer, I insisted on a woodstove for both heat & food.

Not sure about gas stoves, but parts may be an issue as well. Check your HOA for fireplaces/woodstoves and if at all possible GET ONE. That or get a generator to run an electric heater or maybe a kerosene heater??? OR even an attachment to a propane tank for a heater. Though that won't help with the whole house, but will warm a good sized room.

patriceinil
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Location: Illinois

Re: Living Up NORTH - Challenges and Strategies for Success

Unread post by patriceinil » Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:25 pm

Anybody living in a cold climate NEEDS a backup emergency heat source of some type. Even if it’s just to heat a single room, you need something to survive the cold.

Wood stoves are better than fireplaces because they hold the heat in the house better. Fireplaces are notorious for sucking heat out of the house.

In a pinch you can heat a small space with candles and clay pot heaters but they only produce a little bit of heat.

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Icu4dzs
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Re: Living Up NORTH - Challenges and Strategies for Success

Unread post by Icu4dzs » Mon Jan 20, 2020 6:49 am

Old Fashioned wrote:
Sat Jan 18, 2020 3:52 pm
Rhodie Ranch wrote:
Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:19 am
Medford OR had snow the day after I left. It shut down schools, closed roads, and 18K lost electricity. Three inches....

I've been thinking of a wood stove, but they are not allowed in many developments. If I had a pellet stove, it would take electricity. A gas fireplace as I'm on natural gas for the furnace, but does it take electricity? Slightly off topic, but these thoughts have gone thru my mind given what is happening back home.
As for the pellet stove, not only does it take electricity but also parts do break down. We had one for several years, until the auger that fed the pellets to the fire went out & we had to order another from MO that took 3 weeks to arrive...…..all this during the coldest December in many years. Boys & I would huddle under the covers in bed or sit in the car with the heater full blast, even with layers of clothes, plus eating at restaurants. By the following summer, I insisted on a woodstove for both heat & food.

Not sure about gas stoves, but parts may be an issue as well. Check your HOA for fireplaces/woodstoves and if at all possible GET ONE. That or get a generator to run an electric heater or maybe a kerosene heater??? OR even an attachment to a propane tank for a heater. Though that won't help with the whole house, but will warm a good sized room.
The real drawback to the pellet stove is the fuel unless you can burn corn and even then you still need electric power.
I have a pellet stove in the living room. It does require electricity to operate the auger. The only real problem is that even if you have a reliable source for electricity,
if you can’t make your own pellets, and don’t have a ready source of corn, it is useless.
Wood stoves are simpler because they don’t require any special components just a good chimney.
Your believing it is not required for it to be true. TMM
I'd rather have it and not need it, than need it and NOT have it!
Saepe Expertus, Semper Fidelis, Fratres Aeterni
Trim sends
//BT//

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Icu4dzs
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Re: Living Up NORTH - Challenges and Strategies for Success

Unread post by Icu4dzs » Sun Feb 02, 2020 9:13 pm

Up here N of 45 winter comes early and stays late. Last winter was a particularly severe experience. I would prefer NOT to have another like that one. The majority of the winter had temperatures ranging from -20*F and went as low as -40*F. In previous years, we might have had a week of -20*F but not all winter. This year, it has been in the mid +20*F range for much of the winter with the exception of one week. Today, the temperature rose to +38*F. That was amazing.
I spend most of the winter in the wood shop. I have two projects going at the moment. One is a saw till for my hand saws, the other is a chair. You might laugh and ask "Why would you build a chair? They are so plentiful in society. Well, my answer is, "Yes, there are lots of them but this one is built with hand tools and since it is a "etude" rather than something for "sale" I am taking my time and learning all the joinery and parts that go into making such a piece of furniture. I have some pictures of it in different stages so I will publish those when/if I am able. I really don't have much luck with photo's on these internet sites.

The chair is made of pine scrap wood that I had around the farm. I am now able to estimate the amount of good wood I would need to make a nice chair. This is NOT a lounger. It is more of the kind you use in the dining room or kitchen.

Since today is Groundhog Day...I am confused as to what happened with that. During the day, the sun came out 3 different times. It has been cloudy/overcast for nearly the entire winter.

The snow is above average for this time of year but much less than last year. Often, we get two storms in April, one at mid month and one late and then the snow USUALLY stops. *(he said, hopefully !)

Dressing for winter has been fairly easy this year. I have gotten the "layer system" pretty well figured out.
Layer 1= long (polypropylene) underwear over the usual shorts.
Layer 2= polar fleece shirt with collar that folds up to cover neck. A new item this year; Knitted neck warmers made by WW. I wear this all the time now. It is amazing at how much this item does to keep you warm. Basically, it is just a knitted collar ring about 4-5 inches wide. When I change to go to bed, it is the last thing I take off and immediately get a chill. I really like them for all day use.
Layer 3 = polar fleece vest with neck warmer
Layer 4 = the chore coat, Fleece lined; for mild winter days. Otherwise, it is the Carhart Extremes bibbers and jacket for chores with muck boots and Smart wool for socks. WW made some balaclavas out of two layers of polar fleece and added a pocket in them for those Sodium Acetate hand warmers to warm the neck. That is a serious cold weather item that really works well.

Once you decide to go outdoors, it is a procedure and a sequence is necessary in order to get it all on properly. The dogs love waiting for you to get all dressed up to go outside.

Discussion of Snow removal is for another time.
Cheers,
Trim sends
Your believing it is not required for it to be true. TMM
I'd rather have it and not need it, than need it and NOT have it!
Saepe Expertus, Semper Fidelis, Fratres Aeterni
Trim sends
//BT//

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